Bits: A Small Breather for Tech Stocks

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015
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Daily Report

A Small Breather for Tech Stocks | These days, a good day is when not every tech stock ends in the red.

By that measure, Tuesday wasn’t so bad. After being battered for several consecutive days, some leading tech stocks eked out small gains. Netflix rose 4.8 percent; Yahoo was up 1.4 percent; Facebook, 1.1 percent; and Apple, 0.6 percent.
That’s not a major rally, of course, and many tech companies did not escape the day unscathed. Twitter, for example, fell more than 3 percent and Microsoft 2.9 percent. The Nasdaq finished 0.4 percent lower, to 4,506.49. Let’s look at the positive, though. For the first time in about a week, there were glimpses of light at the end of the tunnel.
From tech stocks, we move to tech solutions. Today we’re starting Tech Fix, a regular feature in which we will aim to make personal technology less frustrating by dissecting the cause of problems, using data, reporting and analysis to come up with the best solutions.
In the inaugural installment, Brian Chen explores in-flight Wi-Fi, where prices have soared as high as $40 a session – an outrageous price considering that many people pay about that much for an entire month of high-speed Internet at home.

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Personal Technology
Michael Small, the chief executive of Gogo, said new satellite technology should add capacity and eventually let the company lower prices for in-flight Wi-Fi.

In-Flight Wi-Fi Prices Jump as Demand Surges | Gogo, the top provider of in-flight Wi-Fi, says high demand and reliance on old technology have driven it to double peak prices in the last three years.

The Upside of a Downturn in Silicon Valley | Venture capitalists may actually welcome some of the consequences of leaner times, which could lower costs, decrease competition and toughen up start-ups.

More From The Times
Musa Jamshed, 18, in a computer lab at Public School 41 in Manhattan, where he worked at a chess summer camp for children. Mr. Jamshed, who is entering Lehigh University, took a few online courses last summer when he wasn't working at the chess camp.

How High Schoolers Spent Their Summer: Online, Taking More Courses | Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, intended as college-level work for anyone, are popping up on college applications, a sign of curiosity and, possibly, résumé packing.

Afghans used a generator-powered charging station this month at a camp in Calais, France. The camp's inhabitants hope to cross the Channel to Britain.

A 21st-Century Migrant’s Essentials: Food, Shelter, Smartphone | For the tens of thousands of migrants flooding into Europe, smartphone maps, global positioning apps, social media and WhatsApp have become essential tools.

Co-op City in the Bronx, with more than 15,000 apartments, is one of the places in New York City that has not yet been equipped with Verizon FiOS high-speed Internet.

New York City and Verizon Battle Over FiOS Service | The company says it met its promise to have fiber-optic cable for FiOS pass all three million homes in the city by the end of last year. The city’s response: not even close.

Jeffrey Hurant of Rentboy.com, after his arraignment in Brooklyn on Tuesday, said the site brought

7 Charged With Promoting Prostitution by Working on Rentboy.com, an Escort Website | Lawyers for some of the defendants, including Jeffrey Hurant, the chief executive, said outside federal court in Brooklyn that the arrests raised First Amendment issues.

Zip-a-Dee-Doo-#&$! | A mobile app turned voice recordings into 3-D animated videos. Americans were determined to put a twisted spin on them.

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Insight & Analysis
Jack Ma, the founder of the Alibaba Group, at the Economic Club of New York in June.

Alibaba’s Stock Still Looks Expensive | Growth worries have afflicted all technology stocks and Chinese ones in particular. But Alibaba’s core e-commerce business is still highly valued compared with its rivals.

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