European Morning: Longtime Critic of Modi Is Now a Target

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Top News
The Indian rights activist Teesta Setalvad, center, with two women who lost family members in deadly riots in 2002 in Gujarat.

Longtime Critic of Modi Is Now a Target

By DAVID BARSTOW

Teesta Setalvad, who seeks to hold the Indian prime minister responsible for deadly riots in 2002, has been overwhelmed by attacks emanating from entities controlled by him or his allies.

Khalid al-Asaad, the retired chief archaeologist of the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra.

Shielding Syrian Antiquities, to a Grisly Death at ISIS’ Hands

By BEN HUBBARD

The body of Khalid al-Asaad, the city’s retired director of antiquities, was hung from a Roman column, the state news media and an activist group said.

A poster of Mohammad Allan, a Palestinian prisoner on a hunger strike, displayed during a protest in Rahat, Israel, on Tuesday calling for his release.

Israeli Court Approves Release of Fasting Palestinian

By DIAA HADID

The court said that Mohammad Allan, who has been on a two-month hunger strike, was in such a depleted condition that he no longer posed a security threat.

For more top news, go to INYT.com

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Editors’ Picks
On the waterfront in Sevastopol, Crimea. The number of visitors to the peninsula so far this year is still well below the six million who came in 2013.

WORLD

Russia’s Pitch to Vacationers: Crimea Is for Patriots

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR

A tourist tidal wave has not materialized after Russia annexed the Black Sea peninsula from Ukraine last year, prompting Western sanctions.

Cornel West, center, and other protesters sitting on the steps of the federal courthouse in St. Louis, Mo., on Aug. 10, 2015.

OPINION | Opinionator

Cornel West: The Fire of a New Generation

By GEORGE YANCY and CORNEL WEST

Young protesters in Ferguson and beyond are rekindling the spirit of W.E.B. DuBois and the civil rights struggles of the 1960s and ’70s.


World
Mourners saluted the victims of the explosions. The mayor of Tianjin on Wednesday took responsibility for the disaster.

Chinese Report Details Role of Political Connections in Tianjin Blasts

By DAN LEVIN

The state-run news agency described how two major shareholders in a company gained government approvals for the warehouse where the explosions took place.

Well

Researchers Link Longer Work Hours and Stroke Risk

By CATHERINE SAINT LOUIS

An analysis of data on more than 600,000 people is the largest study thus far of the relationship between working hours and cardiovascular health.

Juanita Huenufil, a Mapuche therapist, heating a drum before prayers last month  in the hut, or ruka, where she sees patients.

Santiago Journal

Alongside a Doctor’s Care, a Dose of Traditional Healing

By PASCALE BONNEFOY

An effort to make the Chilean public health system more inclusive has taken an unusual turn, as non-indigenous patients increasingly look beyond Western medicine.

For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World


Business
Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble, a proponent of the deal, has also raised tough questions.

An Architect of the Latest Greek Bailout Navigates Germany’s Dual Roles

By ALISON SMALE

The job of Finance Minister Wolfgang Schäuble reflects the strains within Germany to enforce its values while also trying to hold a fractious Europe together.

Oil Companies Sit on Hands at Auction for Leases

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS

The low turnout at the Gulf of Mexico auction was the clearest sign yet that the fortunes of oil companies are skidding so fast that they now must reduce plans for production well into the future.

A demonstrator dressed as Ronald McDonald taking part Tuesday in a protest for better wages and working conditions for McDonald's employees in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Union Takes a McDonald’s Challenge Overseas

By NOAM SCHEIBER

A union-led effort to raise wages at the fast-food chain is taking its campaign abroad, hoping to bring further pressure on the company.

For more business news, go to INYT.com/Business


Technology

State of the Art

Ad Blockers and the Nuisance at the Heart of the Modern Web

By FARHAD MANJOO

The adoption of ad-blocking technology is rising steeply. Some see an existential threat to online content as we know it, but others see a new business niche.

Two district attorneys in California are raising questions about the effectiveness of Uber's background checks, saying the ride-hailing service failed to uncover the criminal records of 25 drivers in two cities.

Uber Missed Criminal Records of Drivers, Prosecutors Assert

By CONOR DOUGHERTY

District attorneys in Los Angeles and San Francisco say drivers for the ride-hailing service have included some convicted of murder or sex offenses.

Hackers released data stolen from Ashley Madison, a website that caters to would-be adulterers.

The Ashley Madison Data Dump, Explained

By DANIEL VICTOR

The release of stolen data from a dating website marketed at would-be adulterers promises to roil the marital lives of its members.

For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Tech

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Sports
Sebastian Coe was elected on Wednesday  in Beijing as the new president of the International Association of Athletics Federation.

Global Sports

Hard Climb Awaits Sebastian Coe, New President of I.A.A.F.

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY

Sebastian Coe was elected president of the International Association of Atlhetics Federations on Wednesday in Beijing and set out his ambitions, including an assault on doping.

Emilio Cordova, 85, known as Cuqui, working in his home office.

Oh, the Stories He Could Tell

By JONATHAN BLITZER

Emilio Cordova, with the information he shares in his many books and newspaper columns, is a living, breathing archive of Dominican baseball.

Sonny Bill Williams playing Super Rugby. New Zealand's rugby sevens coach said Williams has skills suited to the shorter, faster sevens version of the game.

Sonny Bill Williams Switches to Rugby Sevens for a Shot at Rio

By EMMA STONEY

Williams, who has won titles in rugby union and rugby league, will concentrate on sevens next year as the sport makes its debut in the Olympics.

For more sports news, go to INYT.com/Sports


U.S. News
Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch has continued the practice of her predecessor in filing so-called statements of interest in local court cases around the country.

Justice Dept. Presses Civil Rights Agenda in Local Courts

By MATT APUZZO

The government has waded into cases involving legal aid, transgender students, juvenile prisoners and people who take videos of police officers.

Hillary Rodham Clinton met with, from left, Daunasia Yancey, Vonds Dubussion and Julius Jones, activists from Black Lives Matter, after an event in Keene, N.H., this month.

Hillary Clinton, Pressed on Race, Issues Her Own Challenge

By MAGGIE HABERMAN

In an exchange with an activist from Black Lives Matter, a candidate who has advocated civil rights for decades shows passion mixed with practicality.

The Parched West

Losing Water, California Tries to Stay Atop Economic Wave

By ADAM NAGOURNEY

Despite the drought, communities are pushing ahead with plans for new housing, with advocates saying there will be enough water to meet the demand.

For more U.S. news, go to NYTimes.com/US


Opinion

Op-Ed Columnist

Activists Confront Hillary Clinton

By CHARLES M. BLOW

Liberals and conservatives alike must answer for how the criminal justice system has been unleashed upon black people in this country.

Op-Ed | Mona Eltahawy

The Middle East’s Morality Police

By MONA ELTAHAWY

Authoritarian regimes’ favorite trick is to rally conservative support by prosecuting women on trumped-up charges of indecency.

Op-Ed | Yu Hua

Blind Faith in China’s Stock Market

By YU HUA

The allure of quick profits tempted many Chinese people to gamble their savings in stocks.

For more opinion, go to INYT.com/Opinion

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